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you. >>steve: it wasn't all football. who could forget commercials like this one? >> we're out of milk. we're going to run down the best and worst of 2013. good morning to you, brian kilmeade. >>brian: thank you. the rock and i go way back. i'll go over that relationship which has hit a roadblock. along with the hoopla surrounding the super bowl, i had a chance to go to baton rouge, louisiana, to the governor's mansion and speak to governor bobby jindal exclusively. you'll see both parts of that interview as we get started on "fox & friends" this monday. >> look at him go. he is flying! inside the 20! a kickoff return. 109 yards. >>gretchen: the ravens kobe jones with a 108-yard kickoff return. the ravens all the rave this morning beating the 49ers to win super bowl xlvii. good morning everybody. live from new york and still in new orleans, brian kilmeade. >>steve: brian, it looks as if you are in your attorney's office. what happened? >>brian: i have a library in louisiana i said if i'm going to stay monday, i'm going to get work done. unlike backdrops, these are actual books. when ev
report and number of other positive data. steve liesman will have more on that in just a minute. but first, if the markets continue to push higher and we hit new highs, the most important question will be whether or not at this point entering a long ---er with entering a long term multiyear bull market for stocks, like we saw in maybe the 1980s and also 2000. you have been talking to people about this, bob pisani, what are you hearing? >> it is a big debate. let me highlight what we need to do here. are we entering a new market like '80s or even 2009 to 2012. stocks have been doing well because the fed is keeping rates at zero. there is also nowhere else to put money right now. companies are doing okay on cost cutting issues as well. pe ratio, 13.5. not exorbitant. >> but that's not enough. not taking us to highs for several years. you need make an argument we should continue the rally for several more years. we need to see much more robust gdp growth and revenue growth which has become anemic. what gives us gdp and revenue growth? clarification from washington. a grand bargain
. ike becky quick along with andrew ross sorkin. joe kernen is off today so we are again joined by steve liesman. also at the table with us this morning, our guest host is andy surel. andrew just talked about the markets. stocks ending at session lows yesterday. in fact, all ten s&p sectors closed lower. yet the bulls betting this is nothing more than a bull pac. but we will have a number of powerful investors for their thoughts throughout yao the morning. jim o'neill will join us in just a few minutes. then in the next half hour, the man charged with making sdigs for how blackrock invests more than $1 trillion, the firm's chief investment strategist, russ koesterich. nouriel roubini will be joining us and we're going to ask him for his current view of the world. in the following hour, buy and hold is the name of his game, barons capital ceo ron baron will be our special guess. he's been talking to us about how great of an opportunity stocks have been. we'll see if he's still feeling that optimistic now that stocks have reached 14,000 or close to it. >>> how majority leader eric cantor i
,@steverattner working diligently on his charts. unfortunate i have to miss it, spin class trumps stats. steve rattner and his sexiness coming up shortly on "morning joe," starts right now. ♪ lights out >>> half the power in new orleans stadium, the superdome here, is out. in almost a perfect semicircle of the lights, half the stadium stayed light, half of it went out. the scoreboard is also not working as well. one big click of the light switch, and we lost power in half of the stadium. >> good morning, everyone. welcome to "morning joe." it is monday, time to wake up bright and early. february 4th. all right. we've got a shot here in the studio of, what, is halperin walking in here? with us -- this is amazing. look at this, the "game change" boys. >> they're back and better than ever. >> we also have the sexy statistician -- >> according to twitter. >> yes. former treasury official and "morning joe" economic analyst, steve rattner. national affairs editor for "new york" magazine and political analyst, john heilemann and senior political analyst, mark halperin. >> what a game. mika, you had to, lik
a super bowl would be steve young we'll get the take on the impressive >>> good evening we come to you live from new orleans we're less than two day frtz kickoff in super bowl 47. the 49ers and ravens both worked out at new orleans saints practice facility today. weather outside was nice, warm and sunny today. yet, jim harbaugh decided to go inside to simulate conditions niners will face on sunday and piped in loud crowd noise just to get used to the conditions. the talk has been about harbaugh brother versus brother it's also father versus son. jim's onjay works on the baltimore staff for john. >> maybe that will be the edge. you know? sent him texts and i don't want to get him worried but i'm proud and have heard he's done a great job. that means the world. >> i got a chance to talk with steve young. >> it's 18 years after a certain someone won a super bowl for 49ers. too long for red and gold. >> i regret 98 and 92. you know? it's like you think of ther÷ru things you came close to. so grateful for 94. it's a great year. you think so close, many times, it's great to see 49ers back.
's got big, bad you in his sights. so the fight has begun. while steve king, matt kibbe, joe walsh, rush limbaugh, all the inhabitants of the cuckoo nest are scrambling because karl rove is drawing lines in the sand. want republicans to win? cut out the crazies? want the democrats, stop giving them easy targets, rape candidates and witches. stop making the democrats look smart and reasonable by running stupid and crazy candidates. the joy is, i have to say this, and it's really quite funny, each of the right wing factions thinks that they are the sane ones, they are the ones who have to protect the party from the others. well, tonight the duel to the death drives deeper. it's do or die, fight to the death. the winners get to run against hillary clinton. the losers get to say it's not their fault they lost. wait a minute. that doesn't make any sense. and neither does this fight on the right for the right to say you're right. with me tonight are two msnbc political analysts, joy reid of the grio and david corn from "mother jones." joy, it really is a joy to watch this, to watch rove runnin
of the president's jobs council, co-founder of aol, steve case, so stick around for that. >>> new pictures this morning of reporters dogging democratic new jersey senator robert menendez. in case you're wondering these pictures were taken outside of his house in washington, d.c. menendez fighting allegations he violated finance laws and had sex with underaged prostitutes. he gave his first on camera comments to cnn regarding this issue. >> reporter: senator menendez do you have any response to violating any campaign finance laws? >> i have comments printed at any office. >> reporter: nameless, faceless? >> anonymous allegations. you should find out who that is. >> the senator is in line to become chairman of the senate foreign relations committee. >>> scary moments for some alaska air passengers. flight was forced to make an emergency landing because the captain passed out. >> and then all of a sudden the attendant started running up and down the aisle, i've never seen them go so fast and they announced if there's any doctors or nurses or anyone aboard to please come forward and then the r
. but is it too sex? kate upton and steve cannon, president and ceo of mercedes benz, join us from new orleans. good morning to both of you. thanks for coming on. >> good morning. >> good morning. >> so kate, you've heard the criticism, the parents television council says it's too sexy, objectifying women. maybe the issue isn't that it's too sexy, but that it's too inappropriate. give me your take on that. >> i don't see how it's inappropriate because i'm not even actually washing the car. >> i mean, is it something you're proud of? >> yes, of course i'm proud of it. i'm -- i'm proud of being a part of the brand. it's such an amazing brand. and it's a symbol of luxury, and now they have this new, beautiful car, the cla, that's affordable and sexy for a younger generation. >> i can see why they hired you as a pitch person. but perfectly there. steve, let me ask you -- i think any company would die for the buzz that this ad is creating. but i don't necessarily know that you like the controversy part of it. give us your thoughts. >> it's certainly created conversation, and conversation is good. w
was in love with te'o. is he citying the truth. >> steve is an expert in interviewing and detecting deception, trained by the fbi. he's worked with cops around the world, training them in lie detection and human behavior. i want to let folks take a look at the interview first. >> me, it i was hurting. i was like whoa, like, you know, i've given so much into this and i realized right then in that moment that i poured so much into lennay that i myself wasn't getting nothing and look what i was left with. i was crying. i was hurt emotionally. just all kinds of things just took over. so right then and there, i made the decision, i can't do this lennay thing anymore. >> looking at this interview, is this someone generally telling the truth or not and how can you tell? >> firstly i look at how people take ownership or possession of the story and also look for the emotions being in the correct places. and also how people answer questions. i believe he is telling the truth in fact in relation to these issues because the emotions are in the right place. i might be able to think of a lie but can i comm
's followed the dictum suggested by the late founder steve jobs. if you produce the best products which arguably apple has done, everything takes care of itself. that's something that's resonated throughout much of steve jobs' biography about walter isaacson. it's a bedrock principle of apple itself. i have to admit i have grasped about apple lately. incredibly low interest rates, that keeps it from earning a decent return for doing nothing at the moment as you used to be able to for so long. i have said that the cash itself has gone from being a positive at a time when so many companies have stretched balance sheets to a negative as it generates a small return. i have suggested they put some of the cash to work, buying the growth that many feel has been lost. perhaps buying twitter to be more moving aggressively into the social media space. or netflix for home entertainment. or even somewhat facetiously purchase amazon, with its itunes-like offers. all that said i never thought in a million years that somehow apple's become a bad actor because of its conservative ways of handling its b
, but is it too sexy? kate upton and steve canon, president and ceo of mercedes-benz join us from new orleans. good morning to both of you. thank you for coming on. >> good morning. >> good morning. >> you heard the criticism. the parents television council says it's too sexual and object p objectifies women. give us your take. >> i don't see how it's inappropriate. i'm not even actually washing the car. >> is it something you are proud of? >> yes, of course i'm proud of it. i'm proud of being a part of the brand. it's such an amazing brand, and it's a symbol of luxury and then now they have this new beautiful car, the cla, that's affordable and sexy for a younger generation. >> i can see why they hired you as pitch person. you did perfectly there. steve, let me ask you, any company would die for the buzz that this ad is creating. i don't know if you necessarily like the controversy part of it. give us your thoughts? >> it certainly created conversation. conversation is good. we think this is inbounds. we try not to take ourselves too seriously. we wanted to have a little fun, and we think we
of scout families. here's john blackstone. >> boy scout troop leader steve tennant and his 16-year-old son christopher have been involved in scouting for the last five years. they are straight, but don't like the policy excluding gays. >> i have a huge problem with that. >> reporter: what did it feel like when you heard that a local troop had thrown out a kid because he was gay? >> i was shocked. shocked and amazed. appalled. i couldn't believe it. >> reporter: the teen thrown out last october was 18-year-old ryan anderson, who was about to become an eagle scout. >> getting my eagle award taken is totally devastating. hearing that it's happening to other scouts is also totally devastating. >> i can't imagine ever doing that to a boy. but that's what this policy would have me do. >> reporter: but others in scouting warn about quickly changing the current policy banning gays. kay godfrey is with the salt lake city scout council that has over 100,000 members. >> we were caught completely off guard with it. we've had a policy that's been in place for over 100 years that seems to have functione
. there is comfort and hope. martha: steve harrigan is live at the kennedy space center in cape canaveral, florida. morning, steve. >> reporter: martha, we're just a few minutes away here from the ceremonies to mark the day of remembrance for men and women who have given their lives in service of space exploration, beginning in 1967 with the apollo 1 tragedy, a fire on board the launch capsule there killed three astronauts, all three on board including gus grissom, who was a member of the mercury program. next in 1986, the space shuttle challenger came apart after just 7 seconds in flight. it was a disaster witnessed by schoolchildren across america. that is because the first teacher in space was one of the seven on board, christa mcauliffe. was later found so have a bad seal in booster rocket. finally in 2003 the space shuttle columbia came apart after a 16-day science mission. among the seven on board was the first israeli astronaut, elan ramon. martha, back to you. martha: steve, thank you. we all remember them today. what a day that was 10 years ago. bill: breaking news now on the attack on ou
through, as steve accurately described, a senate that will not be eager to embrace and control the further we get away daughter will be for democrats to push. lou: and the other initiative on the part of the president that he has made a priority, of course, back with comprehensive immigration reform. is there the appetite for this? standing tall as the leading conservative in the gain of eight. but what is the appetite in the senate for comprehensive immigration reform as has been outlined? >> a gross oversimplification of the state of play here in washington. but i think there are basically three groups. there are people who say, look at where we are today. no matter what what we must avoid is being in this position again. we cannot have 12 million or however many illegal immigrants here in the united states. we have to do everything we can to prevent an eventuality. then you have a second group, more bipartisan, and they say we have to deal with what is in front of us, but we should do what we can to avoid being here again, and thenyou have a third group, and i think the president is, in
to the consumer is like razor. >> razor focus. charlie: steve jobs. obviously he was the once in a generation vionary in terms of repeatey producing products that were beautiful intuitive and loved. >> charlie: what do you make of the fall in their stock price? >> i think my guess is tim cook and that team are not worrying about the short term stock price. they're building for the longer term and stocks go up and down. if you get too focused on that you get distracted. >> charlie: larry page. reated a great company called google who is going through their first real challenges in terms of small disruption around the edges. >> charlie: what is that disruption? >> well, the disvupgs how search is being used. 's a different metaphor. facebook could potentially start searching. disruption is never head on. it's always around the edges. what that forces us to do is a large technology company is to reimagine, reinvent how we operate. >> charlie: mark zucker burg. a brilliant visionary who has done a phenomenal job with facebook. >> charlie: did you see social media coming? >> i saw it in my kids ea
you had a wonderful stock option from steve jobs who was your friend and who you were on his board. you bought a television channel and rekristened it as the current tv and you just sold that and made a handsome profit. you sold to al jazeera and people take note of the fact that al jazeera is in part subsidized or sponsored by the qatar government. >> uh-huh. >> rose: did that cause you a moment of saying look f i do this, if i sell to them, even though i will make a handsome profit, people are going to say oh, i wish you had found a better buyer. >> well, i did extensive diligence on that whole question. of course i understand that critique which was then a potential critique, absolutely. but what the diligence showed very clearly is that al jazeera has long since established itself as an immensely respected news gathering network around the world. it's won the major journalism award in countries after country. it is respected as having integrity. on its climate reporting, for example, it's higher quality and far more expensive than any. u.s. networks. they do 24/7 without any co
should be put away. thank you. >> steve is an independent caller in michigan. >> i want to repeat what the last gentleman said. i'm a junkie on these things. this hearing demonstrated the highest kinds of ways our government should work. the questions were on point, there's was little grandstanding. there was no politicking that i could see. people did have their points compared to the haguele hearings last week. this was the highest and i'm afraid the ones for hagel had to do with the quality of the candidates, particularly, mr. brennan. >> given the fact that was sensitive information. do you feel like you learned a lot from the hearing? caller: yes, i guess i learned more about brennan than i knew. he appears to be, at least by reputation in the way they talked about him that he's not going to be so secretive as some of the past c.i.a. directors have been. i'm sure there are things he committed to that he went be able to do. >> he spent time in the c.i.a. and he was former executive deputy director from 2001-2003. bill is on the republican line. bill, hello. caller: how are you? >>
steve? >> how are you guys. >> you have got to do your homework and not just bet willy-nilly. >> that's absolutely right. that's why a lot of people seek advice for the big game that's what we are here for. >> don't get over your head. i have done that in the past, steve. what do you mean by that? >> well, what people have to realize this is just one game. i know it's the final game, it's it the prom. it's the last dance you can't get overexcited and make up for a whole season worth of losses with one big bet in the big game. one game and you will have fun with it. >> tell us about. this you say you have to get that extra half point. you ought to spend the money on it because this is the best way to win. >> now the line moved to 4 points. four is a number that comes out a lot. grab an extra point buy it down to three and a half or four and a half. which side you like. you wouldn't do that during the course of the seasonal. being that it's the last game of the year. go ahead and take that extra half a point and give yourself the best chance to win. >> if you don't know what that means,
on this post-super bowl wrap-up day. steve liesman, we'll see you tomorrow. join us tomorrow. "squawk on the street" starts right now. >>> good morning. welcome to "squawk on the street." i'm carl quintanilla, with melissa lee, jim cramer. david faber is off. signs of reemerging political turmoil, both in spain, and in italy making investors a little bit reluctant to press the button for the upside. it comes after the dow did top 14,000 on friday for the first time in more than five years. look at europe, that's where the story's going to be for most of the morning before we close at 11:30 eastern time. germany taking it down 1,100 points as well. asia got action as well as china. nonmanufacturing came in better than expected. clearly the story is going to be in europe for most of the morning. >> we've certainly seen a flight to safety take place this morning, as we've seen the bond yields, particularly the spanish 10-year bond yields blowing out overnight. we're seeing bids higher today. german bonds also higher. the 10-year yield in the united states, back below 2% at this point. >>
by the press in which he said steve brought to the energy department a unique understanding of both the urgent challenge presented by climate change and the tremendous opportunity that clean energy represents for our economy. the statement went on to say i'm grateful that he joined to my cabinet and i wish him all of the best in his future endeavors. a quick reminder we have live coverage coming up here on c-span2. and about 40 minutes we will have a discussion on the conflict in northern mali ouis many years ago louis brandeisott wrote that the most important office in a democracy is the office of citizen. a democracy of course is rootedf and based in the notion of ansos enlightened citizenry to read some of us think that democracy is defined by the ritual votings of course in voting it is dem important inoc a democracy. voting takes place all over then world. it takes place in democracies.n it takes place in dictatorships. it takes place in a totalitarian societies. voting alone doesn't mean we live in a free society. fre we live in a free society when it is based on an enlightened citizenry
of the disadvantaged. host: laudan aron? because really what steve said is the main point. the panel just did not have a lot of data to really begin to cross-national differences on that, but it is clearly a very intuitive and logical line of research that we would love to continue to support with additional data. i did also want to point out that so many of these comments about our lifestyles and exercise and pe with children are really about prevention. not getting ill to begin with. it does seem that especially since we documented this, the pervasiveness of the help disadvantaged across the life course, trying to prevent illness early in life and keeping americans healthy is really the way to go. if we could figure out how to do that on all fronts, i think we would be in much better shape. host: a viewer tweets in -- can you go through the good news? what did you find that gives hope? guest: there are definitely a few areas where we did not find a disadvantage, and we were at the top of the heap, so to speak. one of them, ages above 75 -- age-specific mortality rates at those higher ages are defini
for me. >> i've got doritos. >> steve, what is the hold up? ♪ >> go neil, go neil, go neil. >> is that my wedding dress? >> could be. >> daddy, can you be a princess with me? >> that is so funny. you are the winner in terms of the doritos choice, the company choice. $300 is what i read, is what it cost to make that ad. tell me about the inspiration and how you did it. >> my friends and i, we wanted to make something that was very family friend ly and do kind ofa father-daughter piece since we hadn't seen that in the super bowl before. originally, we were thinking we could do to a tea party scene and the friends come in and the father catch him in the makeup. it wasn't funny enough yet, so it eventually grew and grew until a full-on princess fashion show. >> now i want to play the goat for sale ad. this ad was hilarious too. ♪ ♪ >> the viewers choice ad. tell me about your ad. it cost $5,000 to make. i heard your entire family was involved in the project. >> that's right. my mom and my dad, they've supported me even when i was a little kid running around with the home video camera. the
, democratic caller. steve. caller: good morning. i am a democrat but i tend to stay independent with things. it seems like the republicans -- it might not be true, but there is always the appearance that you want to push the pain on a broader section and towards the bottom. to that, i had a couple of questions. what is your stance on competitive bidding for rd medicare? -- four part d medicare? also, the simple fix for social security of raising the cap might even if it is just to say 200,000 dollars, and i am sure your mom did not lay bricks, so raising the medicare age to 67 for someone that laid bricks their whole life might not be great. host: congressman? guest: the caller is correct, she did not lay bricks, budget a lot of jobs. she worked for the, a dental asn later years. but you are right. on that point, the idea -- i guess his point is when you talk about raising the age, can you do it? what sort of career, what sort of rights do you have? that is an interesting discussion to have. it gets more complicated because you could say i laid bricks 30 years ago but now for the last 20 ye
, democrat caller. steve. caller: good morning. i am a democrat but i tend to stay independent with things. it seems like the republicans -- it might not be true, but there is always the appearance that youant to push the pain on a broader section and towar the bottom. to that, i had a couple of questions. what is your stance on competitive bidding for rd medicare? -- four part d medicare? also, the simple fix for social security of raising the cap might even if it is just to say 200,000 dollars, and i am sure your mom did not lay bricks, so raising the medicare age to 67 for someone that laid bricks their whole life might not be great. host: congressman? guest: the caller is correct, she did not lay bricks, budget a lot of jobs. she worked for the, a dental asn later years. but you are right. on that point, the idea -- i guess his point is when you talk about raising the age, can you do it? what sort of career, what sort of rights do you have? that is an interesting discussion to have. it gets more complicated because you could say i laid bricks 30 years ago but now for the last 20 years
, thank you for the great work that you guys are doing each afternoon day. to steve israel who worked tirelessly to bring on 49 new outstanding members of this caucus. [cheers and applause] i am looking forward to spending time with all 49 of you. hopefully we'll see you at the white house and at various events but i know you came here to get something done. i look forward to working with you every single day to do what is right by the people who sent us here. i changed the format here. originally the way this is scheduled, i was going to talk and shake some hands and i thought since this is not a shy bunch. it might make sense for me to take some questions and advice, i'm sure you guys have for me. what i'm going to do is make a few points a the top and what i would like is maybe somebody can come up here and you can call on folks and we'll spend a little time with q&a before i have a chance to say hello to everybody. i want to keep my remark short because i made a pretty long speech a couple weeks ago. i'm about to make another one next week and i don't want you guy tired of me. dee
Search Results 0 to 44 of about 45 (some duplicates have been removed)